This week in tech: $150K to track the homeless, and a trippy NFT gallery

The city hires someone to run its cloud computing system that tracks the homeless. A job offer was posted about a week ago at Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing looking for a person to run the navigation and online entry system (ONE). The system tries to combine data from different organizations and municipal departments to give a complete record of a homeless person. The idea is to better organize the records of shelters and social services so that the City can better serve the homeless. But that word “tracking” is also evident in the ad: “The system is intended to ‘provide ongoing tracking and reporting,'” it reads. Salary is $124,000 to $159,000. In the right hands, he could explore technological solutions to one of the city’s biggest problems…

A trippy NFT art exhibit heads to the charming gallery of The old mint next month. “Verse: The art of the futurewill fill the formerly swanky space with digital art, including augmented reality holograms and non-fungible token art. For the uninitiated, NFTs are unique digital artworks that are controversial as some people think this is a complete scam. Others think they are the future of collectibles and a great way for artists to make money. This may be an opportunity to experience the whole scene for yourself Here’s my favorite description of the show: “a silent disco for holograms”. That sound you hear is of San Franciscans packing their edibles, putting on their grooviest COVID masks and getting ready to leave, “Whoa, duuuuuude…”

If you’re wondering when cryptocurrency burst into the national consciousness, I’d tell you ten years ago when the night soap “The Good Wife” centered a plot around virtual money in season 3, episode 13. Like when “Grey’s Anatomy” did an episode of ransomware in 2017. You know you did it when nightly soap operas give you an episode…

Guess what year was this headline at the top of a page in the San Francisco Examiner? “Why are so many computer engineers moving to Boston? » Have you guessed 2021? 2008, maybe? The answer is: 1959. I keep telling you that we’re not that special. Then, as now, tech talent was in demand, and Sylvania was picking up coders from The City and shipping them to Beantown. One caveat: Sylvania was looking for “creative men from all over the country.”…

Speaking of sexism in tech, new data from the startup ratings firm PitchBook shows that investors give to male startup founders more than double what they give to women. This is the biggest gap in a decade. Startups with all male founders raised a median of $5 million per round of funding in 2021. Startups with all female founders raised a median of $2 million per round of funding last year. It’s not 1959. What’s the excuse now for not investing in female startups as well?…

Here’s another thing that will irritate your skin: google was arrested again for treating its contractors like second-class citizens. This time it’s to not offer contractors COVID testing like they do for full-time workers. Seems like an ugly place to draw the line. I spoke with the contractor Christopher Colley in the Cleveland area, who says he has no health benefits and earns $10 an hour working for RaterLabs to train Google’s ads algorithm, one of the biggest moneymakers for the $1.9 trillion company. “All workers are important enough to take their health seriously,” he told me. In this “two-tiered workforce,” says Colley, on her team, “Nothing about the pandemic has been mentioned by our direct employer since April 2020.” Come on, Google. You’re a great place to work, say full-time employees. Why not treat contractors better?…

The small unincorporated community of Remote, Oregon is becoming home to all kinds of businesses on LinkedIn and other job boards.  (Photo by Peggy Ann Rowe-Snyder)

The small unincorporated community of Remote, Oregon is becoming home to all kinds of businesses on LinkedIn and other job boards. (Photo by Peggy Ann Rowe-Snyder)

Finally, this is relevant in the age of the distributed workforce: From a distance, Oregon, attracts attention lately because LinkedIn and job boards often automatically locate remote job postings there. I noticed this on LinkedIn and googled it all. from Portland oregonian notes that the current town, which is about 100 miles south of Eugene, consists of a covered bridge, a gas station, and not much else. He got his name for a reason. Hey, sounds like a great place to work. In case you were wondering, you can also work from home — a town called Home, that is, in West Virginia, Washington, Pennsylvania and Kansas. I heard the food was really good there…

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Loveland Museum to showcase abstract work by artist Jennie Kiessling

Loveland Museum to showcase abstract work by artist Jennie Kiessling

7 top NFT projects in 2022 that will be a hit amongst collectors

7 top NFT projects in 2022 that will be a hit amongst collectors